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What You Need to Know About Valley Fever
I recently read an article on Valley Fever and have felt compelled to share it with everyone. With case numbers on the rise, Valley Fever poses a danger for anyone in Phoenix or the rest of the valley. Not many people know about Valley Fever, what causes it and the signs and symptoms to look out for. The article below was written by Eric Schwerin, June 26, 2013. The article is a bit long but please share it with all of...

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Pneumonia: Bacterial and Viral Infections (From Centers for Disease Control website)
Bacterial and viral infections have many things in common. Both types of infections are caused by microbes -- bacteria and viruses, respectively -- and spread by things such as: Coughing and sneezing. Contact with infected people, especially through kissing and sex. Contact with contaminated surfaces, food, and water. Contact with infected creatures, including pets, livestock, and insects such as fleas and ticks. Microbes can also cause: Acute infections, which are short-lived. Chronic infections, which can last for weeks, months, or a lifetime. Latent infections, which may not...

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Walking Pneumonia; The Sneaky Disease Part I
Recently my brother suffered heart failure and had a five vein bypass. He is better and recovered stronger than before. One of the things that we found out was when his heart failed he had walking pneumonia. This did not cause his heart failure, but created the additional stress on this heart as he was struggling to breath. My first thought was “I have heard that term before. Walking pneumonia. Is it bacterial? Is it Viral? How is it different...

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MERS Outbreak in South Korea – Part 1
South Korea reported a 10th death from a MERS outbreak on Thursday, although officials say they believe the disease has peaked. The victim was a 65-year-old man who had been treated for lung cancer and was hospitalized in the same facility as another MERS patient, the Health Ministry said. The outbreak of Middle East respiratory syndrome has caused panic in South Korea. It has infected more than 120 people since the first case, a 68-year-old man who had traveled...

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U.S. Thaw with Cuba, may help in the fight against Cancer
As U.S. relations with Cuba thaw, one unexpected byproduct could be the introduction of a Cuban-developed vaccine to fight against cancer. A vaccine in the U.S. Called Cimavax, an innovative vaccine that was developed to help treat lung cancer patients in Cuba, where lung cancer is one of the leading causes of death. The immunotherapy treatment could be coming to the U.S. thanks in part to the Roswell Park Cancer Institute in Buffalo, New York, which is working with Cuba's...

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What is a Blood borne Pathogen?
What is a Blood borne Pathogen? Exposures to blood and other body fluids occur across a wide variety of occupations. Health care workers, emergency response and public safety personnel, and other workers can be exposed to blood through needle-stick and other sharps injuries, mucous membrane, and skin exposures. The pathogens of primary concern are the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), hepatitis B virus (HBV), and hepatitis C virus (HCV). Workers and employers are urged to take advantage of available engineering controls...

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Antibiotic Resistance Part 1
In this month’s National Geographic, I came across a fascinating article about antibiotic resistance. The recent scare in California of a bacteria, spread in hospitals through a special type of scope used in the pancreas and bile ducts, is raising awareness. CRE is not only spread through medical devices, but through wounds and stool. The chronic overuse of antibiotics for every sniffle, bacterial or not, is to blame for the resistance of bacteria to antibiotics. Patients with weak immune systems,...

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The History of Measles – Straight from the CDC
The Pre-Vaccine Era The history of measles dates back to the 9th century when a Persian doctor published one of the first written accounts of measles disease. Francis Home, a Scottish physician, demonstrated in 1757 that measles is caused by an infectious agent in the blood of patients. In 1912, measles became a nationally notifiable disease in the United States, requiring U.S. healthcare providers and laboratories to report all diagnosed cases. In the first decade of reporting, an average of 6,000...

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Ebola – Part III
Working with Deadly Pathogens Because Ebola is highly contagious, health care workers in the U.S. wear protective equipment (Personal Protective Equipment-PPE) to prevent transmission.  Items worn include: Mask: Prevents infectious agents from getting into mucus membranes inside the mouth nose or eyes. Gloves: Keep broken skin from contact with infectious fluids r needle sticks.  workers often wear two pairs in case one breaks. Full-body protective suit: Usually made of a fluid and air resistant, woven plastic fiber.  Suit prevents exposure to body fluids,...

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Ebola Effects on Humans – Part II
Ebola's effects on humans Ebola can be spread to humans only after symptoms have begun. Symptoms can appear from two to 21 days after exposure. Day 5-9: Fatigue, headache, fever and chills Day 10: High fever, vomiting blood, rash, passive behavior Day 11: Bleeding from the nose, mouth, eyes, and anus Day 12: Seizures, internal bleeding, loss of consciousness, death

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